Obverse Quilt
Obverse Quilt

Obverse Quilt

Detail

Detail

Deatils from similar scarf

Deatils from similar scarf

ZFC1737

1876 Centennial Quilt with Declaration of Independ

Sub-collection: Veninga - Quilt Collection

1876 Centennial Quilt with Declaration of Independence.
This cotton quilt, signed by its maker in 1876 was fabricated by hand and machine in the year of the Centennial celebration of the United States of America. Americans have always been proud of the Declaration of Independence, and thus they have been using the document as a design motif since the beginning of the republic. The Declaration of Independence was printed onto fabrics and used for various types of clothing, accessories, and interior décor. Images of the Declaration of Independence became the subject matter for patriotic images both as art and textiles. Please see ZFC0212 for a printed patriotic textile circa 1824, and ZFC2290 for patriotic lace embroidery of the event circa 1876.

Americans, around the time of the centennial celebrations of 1876, began to focus their patriotism in commercial creations using the documents text as patterns. Textiles such as these were designed for the 100th anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Independence, and this quilt is a perfect example of the many items produced for this occasion. The creator of this quilt used a printed cotton scarf as the centerpiece, which features the text of the Declaration of Independence and facsimiles of the signatures. This is surrounded by a decorative border made from images of the seals of the original 13 states intertwined with the names of revolutionary war heroes. This is entirely surrounded by a blue border.

Scarves such as the one in this quilt were popular during the centennial and have been identified and included in the landmark Smithsonian book, Threads of History, entry 419. There were at least two versions of the scarf, identical save for the borders being either red or blue. The blue border of the scarf on this quilt is the less frequently seen of the two. The body of the quilt surrounding the scarf is pieced together with "blocks" or sections of printed brown paisley cotton fabric. The border is constructed of a darker different print.

Pieced block prints are one of the most common styles of textiles to survive from the 19th century. What cause this to be significant and rare are the combination of the Declaration of Independence and the inclusion of the makers name and date. While the date of 1876 is readable, the creators name is indistinct and illegible and will require restoration and conservation to be able to be read.

Provenance:

• Quilt signed, makers name indistinct, made in July of 1876
• Mark French Antique Quilts, Yellow Springs, OH, until 1999
• Purchase on Internet Auction by Louise Veninga Zaricor for Zaricor Flag Collection, 1999

Sources:




Collins, Herbert Ridgeway, Threads of History: Americana recorded on cloth, 1775 to the present, City of Washington, Smithsonian Institution Press, 1979

Dunworth, Melissa, What is a Pieced Quilt?, Quilting Types and Styles, Quilting Gallery Blog, 23 June 2013, from: http://quiltinggallery.com/2012/03/06/quilting-types-and-styles/

Quilts, Wikipedia, 23 June 2013, from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quilt#Quilting_styles

Zaricor Flag Collection (ZFC) Archives, 2013

Image Credits:
Zaricor Flag Collection
Cowan's Auctions








Hoist & Fly

Width of Hoist 73
Length of Fly 98

Frame

Is it framed? no

Stars

Are there stars on obverse? no
Are there stars on reverse? no

Stripes

Has a Blood Stripe? no

Crest/Emblem

Description of Crest/Emblem PRINTED COPY OF THE DECLARATION SEWN INTO AN 1876
CENTENNIAL QUILT.

Nationality

Nation Represented United States

Fabric

Fabric Cotton

Stitching

Stitching Combination
Comments on Stitching Hand & Machine stitching

Applica

Applique Sides Double Sided = Two sides different

Condition

Condition Good
Damage USED, SMALL TEARS, AND FABRIC SEPARATION.
Displayable yes

Date

Date 1876