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ZFC0267

U.S. Army Artillery Guidon, WWI.

Sub-collection: U.S. Military

U.S. Army 308th Arty. Guidon Battery E, WWI.
Until 1886 the light artillery - field artillery - companies of the U.S. Army had traditionally used the same guidons in field maneuvers as the cavalry. Beginning that year, the artillery was provided with new regimental flags and battery guidons that matched their branch color. Those flags were red and bore the traditional crossed cannon insignia of the artillery. The guidon was completed by addition of the regimental number and the battery letter, the latter below and the former above the crossed cannons.
The 308th was part of the National Army formed during World War One. It was raised in New York, New Jersey, and areas of Pennsylvania adjacent to them as a part of the 78th Division. The 78th was nicknamed the "Lightning Division" by the French, because the battlefield looked as if it had been struck by lightning after they fought there.

Until 1886, the field artillery and light companies in the United States Army traditionally used the same guidons in the battle field within the cavalry service. However, in 1886 that all changed and the artillery was provided with new battery guidons as well as flags that matched their branch colors. Those flags were red and bore the traditional crossed cannon insignia of the artillery. The guidon was completed by addition of the regimental number and the battery letter, the latter below and the former above the crossed cannons.

The 308th was part of the National Army formed during World War One. It was raised in New York, New Jersey, and areas of Pennsylvania adjacent to them as a part of the 78th Division. The 78th was nicknamed the "Lightning Division" by the French, because the battlefield looked as if it had been struck by lightning after they fought there.

This particular guidon conforms to the pattern that was adopted for field artillery batteries back in 1886 but unusually it is made from bunting, which is a feature that was not used in guidons until 1890. As mentioned, this guidon belonged to the 308th Field Artillery Regiment, Battery (Company) E and it was used in federal service during World War I.

This flag is cut into a swallow-tailed shape and is made of red bunting. It has been stitched with a machine and in the center there are two crossed cannon barrels that are yellow in color and also a letter "E" and the figures "308". The flag is attached with a sleeve that was formed by doubling the flag over and the hoist edge of the flag has then been stitched into place.

Exhibition History

First Presidio Exhibit
United States Army Model 1886 Artillery Guidon, Battery E, 308th U.S. Field Artillery

Second Presidio Exhibit, 2003 - GALLERY VI
(ZFC0267)
United States Army Model 1886 Artillery Guidon Bat. E, 308th U.S. Field Artillery

Publication History:
Madaus, Howard M., Dr, Whitney Smith, The American Flag: Two Centuries of Concord and Conflict. Santa Cruz: VZ Publications, 2006, p. 120.

Provenance: Acquired by the Zaricor Flag Collection (ZFC0267) in 1997 from the Baltimore Antique Gun show, Baltimore, MD.

ZFC Important Flag
Item is Framed

Sources:



Madaus, Howard M. - Whitney Smith, The American Flag: Two Centuries of Concord and Conflict, VZ Publications, Santa Cruz, 2006.

Quartermaster General US Army, U.S. Army Uniforms and Equipment, 1889, reprint, University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln, 1986, pp. 132.

Guidon, Wikipedia, 22 April 2012, from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guidon_%28United_States%29



Hoist & Fly

Width of Hoist 40
Length of Fly 27

Stripes

Size of Hoist 2.25

Frame

Is it framed? yes
Frame Height 38.5
Frame Length 49.5

Stars

Are there stars on obverse? no
Are there stars on reverse? no

Stripes

Has a Blood Stripe? no

Crest/Emblem

Description of Crest/Emblem 2 canons + Text : "308 E"

Nationality

Nation Represented United States

Stitching

Stitching Machine

Attachment

Method of Attachment Sleeve

Documentation

Documents
All original documents and drawings are held in the Zaricor Flag Collection Archives.
Drawings
All original documents and drawings are held in the Zaricor Flag Collection Archives.

Condition

Condition Good
Damage Bottom right corner ripped off
Displayable yes

Date

Date 1917

Exhibits

Exhibition Copy First Presidio Exhibit
(ZFC0267)
UNITED STATES ARMY MODEL 1886 ARTILLERY GUIDON, BATTERY E, 308TH U.S. FIELD ARTILLERY
Date: 1917-1918
Media: Wool bunting with cotton inscriptions; machine sewn
Comment: The light or field artillery companies of the United States Army until 1886 had traditionally used the same guidons in field maneuvers as the cavalry service. In 1886, that changed, and the artillery was provided with new regimental flags and battery guidons that matched their branch colorredand bore the crossed cannon insignia of the artillery branch. The regimental number and the battery letter completed the guidon design, with the latter above and the former below the crossed cannons. When the United States entered World War I, the numerous state national guard units were absorbed into the U.S. Army and assigned regimental numbers in the U.S. Army. In this case the old state designation became the 308th U.S. Artillery, Battery E.
Provenance: Acquired by the Zaricor Flag Collection (ZFC0267) in 1997 from Baltimore Antique Gun show, Baltimore, MD.


Second Presidio Exhibit, 2003 - GALLERY VI
(ZFC0267)
United States Army Model 1886 Artillery Guidon Bat. E, 308th U.S. Field Artillery

Date: 19171918
Media: Wool bunting with cotton inscriptions; machine-sewn
Comment: Until 1886 the light artillery (field artillery) companies of the U. S. Army had traditionally used the same guidons in field maneuvers as the cavalry service. Beginning that year the artillery was provided with new regimental flags and battery guidons that matched their branch color. These flags were red and bore the crossed cannon insignia of the artillery branch. The regimental number and the battery letter completed the guidon design, the latter being above and the former below the crossed cannons. When the United States entered World War I, the numerous state national guard units were absorbed into the U.S. Army and were assigned regimental numbers in the U.S. Army. In this case the old state designation became the 308th U.S. Artillery, Battery E.

Provenance: Acquired by the Zaricor Flag Collection (ZFC0267) in 1997 from the Baltimore Antique Gun show, Baltimore, MD.

Publications

Publication Images
The American Flag: Two Centuries of Concord and Conflict

The American Flag: Two Centuries of Concord and Conflict