Obverse
Obverse

Obverse

Reverse

Reverse

Book Photo

Book Photo

OBVERSE - 2

OBVERSE - 2

ZFC0126

U.S. 19 Star Exclusionary Flag.

Sub-collection: Star Spangled Banner Flag House

19 Star U.S. Northern Abolitionist Exclusionary Flag, 1861.
There never was an official 19-star flag; the 15-star 15-stripe flag served throughout 1795-1818 even though five new states (Tennessee 1796, Ohio 1803, Louisiana 1812, Indiana 1816 and Mississippi 1817) joined the Union during that period. Because this flag is constructed in part by a sewing machine (not invented until the 1840's and not in mass production until the decade 1850-1860) it is estimated to date from the 1860s. Its 14-star pattern encircling a central star, with an added star in each corner of the canton was a popular design for the Stars & Stripes from the Mexican War through the Civil War. It is suspected, therefore, that this is an exclusionary flag, made in the North sometime between January 1861, when Kansas was admitted to the Union as the thirty-fourth state, and February 1861 with the establishment of the Confederate States of America.

The field of this flag is composed of thirteen alternating red and white horizontal wool-bunting stripes, machine sewn, with the top and the bottom stripes both red. Inset into the upper hoist corner is a dark blue wool/bunting union/canton 16.25 inches w. X 14.5 inches bearing 19 white cotton, 5-pointed stars, each 1.75 inches across, sewn by hand on the obverse and reverse sides. Fourteen of the stars form a circle around a c star, and one other star is also sewn in each corner of the canton to total nineteen. The flag is finished with a .75 inch white polished cotton heading bearing three hand-formed button-hole eyelets for ties used to secure the flag to a staff. Framed (outside dimensions 34 x 50).

Exhibition History:

First Presidio Exhibit
(ZFC0126)
19-Star United States Exclusionary Flag.

Second Presidio Exhibit, 2003 Gallery III
(ZFC0126)
19-Star United States Exclusionary Flag.

Publication History:
Madaus, Howard M., Dr, Whitney Smith, The American Flag: Two Centuries of Concord and Conflict. Santa Cruz: VZ Publications, 2006, p. 63.

Schrambling, Regina, "A Lifelong Pledge." Collection, Published by Robb Report, June 2014, p. 48A.

Provenance:
• Acquired by Mr. Lloyd Kirkley Baltimore, MD., 1970.
• Gifted to the Star Spangled Banner Flag House & Museum, until 1996.
• Acquired by the Zaricor Flag Collection from the Star-Spangled Banner Flag House Collection of Baltimore, MD. in 1996.


ZFC Significant Flag
Item is Framed

Sources:



Madaus, Howard M.- Whitney Smith, The American Flag: Two Centuries of Concord and Conflict, VZ Publications, Santa Cruz, 2006.

Mastai, Boleslaw and Marie-Louise D'Otrange, The Stars and The Stripes: The American Flag as Art and as History from the Birth of the republic to the Present, Knopf, New York, 1973.

Preble, George Henry, The History of the Flag of the United States of America, Boston, Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 1894.

Image Credits:
Zaricor Flag Collection



Hoist & Fly

Width of Hoist 42.75
Length of Fly 26

Union/Canton

Width of Union/Canton 16.5
Length of Union/Canton 14.25

Stars

Size of Stars 1.75

Stripes

Width of 1st Stripe 2.5
Width of 3rd Stripe 2.5
Width of 8th Stripe 2
Width of Last Stripe 1.75
Size of Hoist 0.75

Frame

Is it framed? yes
Frame Height 34
Frame Length 50

Stars

Number of Stars 19
How are the stars embeded? Hand Stitched
Are there stars on obverse? yes
Are there stars on reverse? yes
Comments on Stars Machine-stitched with hand-stitched stars

Stripes

Number of Stripes 13
Color of Top Stripe Red
Color of Bottom Stripe Red
Has a Blood Stripe? no

Nationality

Nation Represented United States

Fabric

Fabric Wool
Comments on Fabric Bunting.
Cotton stars

Stitching

Stitching Machine

Thread

Thread Material Cotton

Attachment

Comments on Method of Attachmen not metal
Method of Attachment Grommets

Documentation

Documents


Public Copy & Signs






Condition

Condition Good
Damage Discolored to yellow
Displayable yes

Date

Date Circa 1850's

Exhibits

Exhibition Copy Exhibition History
First Presidio Exhibit
(ZFC0126)
19-STAR UNITED STATES EXCLUSIONARY FLAG
Date: 1861
Medium: Wool bunting and cotton stars; machine- stitched with hand-stitched stars
Comment: Because this flag is machine-sewn it can date to no earlier than 1850, although the 19 stars in its union would lead one to think it was made in honor of the admission of Indiana to the Union in 1816. Its star pattern 14 stars encircling a central one, with an added star in each corner of the canton was a popular design for the Stars and Stripes from the Mexican War through the Civil War. It is suspected, therefore, that this is an exclusionary flag, made in the North sometime between January 1861 (when Kansas was admitted to the Union as the thirty-fourth state) and the February 1861 establishment of the Confederate States of America. Although the states that formed the Confederacy considered themselves entirely free of the Union upon secession, Abraham Lincolns administration refused throughout the Civil War to recognize the legitimacy of their putative withdrawal from the United States. While that was the official position of the government, contemporary evidence indicates that a few Northerners did make flags that excluded the seceded slave states.
Provenance: Acquired by the Zaricor Flag Collection (ZFC0126) in 1996 from the Star-Spangled Banner Flag House Collection of Baltimore, MD.


Second Presidio Exhibit, 2003 GALLERY III
(ZFC0126)
19-Star United States Exclusionary Flag
Date: 1861
Medium: Wool bunting and cotton stars; machine-stitched with hand-stitched stars
Comment: Because this flag is machine-sewn it can date to no earlier than 1850, although the 19 stars in its union would lead one to think it was made in honor of the admission of Indiana to the Union in 1816. Its star pattern14 stars encircling a central one, with an added star in each corner of the canton was a popular design for the Stars and Stripes from the Mexican War through the Civil War. It is suspected, therefore, that this is an exclusionary flag, made in the North sometime between January 1861 (when Kansas was admitted to the Union as the thirty-fourth state) and the February 1861 establishment of the Confederate States of America.
Although the states that formed the Confederacy considered themselves entirely free of the Union upon secession, Abraham Lincolns administration refused throughout the Civil War to recognize the legitimacy of their putative withdrawal from the United States. While that was the official position of the government, contemporary evidence indicates that a few Northerners did make flags that excluded the seceded slave states.
Provenance: Acquired by the Zaricor Flag Collection (ZFC0126) in 1996 from the Star-Spangled Banner Flag House Collection of Baltimore, MD.
PDF for Publications
Robb Report - June 2014

Publications

Publication Copy Publication History:
Madaus, Howard M., Dr, Whitney Smith, The American Flag: Two Centuries of Concord and Conflict. Santa Cruz: VZ Publications, 2006, p. 63.

19-Star United States Exclusionary Flag

Because this flag is machine-sewn it can date to no earlier than 1850, although the 19 stars in its union would lead one to think it was made in honor of the
admission of Indiana to the Union in 1816. Its star pattern 14 stars encircling a central one, with an added star in each corner of the cantonwas a popular design for the Stars & Stripes from the Mexican War through the Civil War. It is suspected, therefore, that this is an exclusionary flag, made in the North sometime between January 1861when Kansas was admitted to the Union as the thirty-fourth stateand the February 1861 establishment of the Confederate States of America. Although the states that formed the Confederacy considered themselves entirely free of the Union upon secession, Abraham Lincolns administration refused throughout the Civil War to recognize the legitimacy of their putative withdrawal from the United States. While that was the official position of the government, contemporary evidence indicates that a few Northerners did make flags that excluded the seceded slave states.