EDIT
EDIT

EDIT

info - edit

info - edit

Reverse - edit

Reverse - edit

Obverse - edit

Obverse - edit

Canton - edit

Canton - edit

Obverse

Obverse

Reverse

Reverse

Lable

Lable

Obverse

Obverse

Detail - Edit

Detail - Edit

ZFC0276

37 Star U.S. Flag, Abraham Lincoln's Funeral.

Sub-collection: Lincoln

37 Star U.S. Flag laid upon President Lincoln's casket in Philadelphia, PA 1865.
On April 14, 1865 President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated by a Southern sympathizer, a prominent actor, John Wilkes Booth, from a respected family of America's best stage actors of the time. He committed this act in revenge for the Northern triumph over the South during the Great American Civil War. A shocked and stunned country embraced their martyred President as never before. This and other artifacts from the period of the national funeral helps tell the story of the nation's respect for the President who had guided the country through the most terrible war of all wars in its past and also its future todate.

The funeral of Abraham Lincoln was a process rather than an event, and crowds flocked to railroad stations and sidings all along the route from Washington D.C. to Springfield, Illinois. Mementos such as these are quiet rare due to the nature of the pieces and they represent some of the best to survive from that national event.

The practice to have a personal flag placed upon the coffin pressages what today is not only an accepted custom but now a part of the funeral protocol of deceased "Offical" and armed forces personnel. At the time this flag was placed on the President's coffin it was not a wide practice to do such acts. Historians speculate the act of placing the national flag upon coffin or casket as it was referred to then heralds back to the American Civil War. The first such occurance was not recorded, therefore to have such a documented record of such an historically important symbolic show of appreciation and respect for the deceased is quiet remarkable. For it to be President Lincoln makes it all the more desirable and compelling of its importance to this now nationally accepted custom.

This 37 star U.S. flag is believed to be such a memorial piece related to the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. Text hand written on label under flag:
"Washington DC November 2 1922. This is to certify that this silk flag 16X25.5 with 2 = 1iX16i = Red, White + Blue streamers. Now in possession of Aston Heitmeuller was draped on the coffin of the President Abraham Lincoln in Philadelphia, Pa. in Independence Hall, April 21, 1865 and was presented to my mother, Mrs. Caughlin by Joe Story, the Guard."

Although the 37 star flag would not become official until 1867, it was common practice in 19th century America to add stars to the flag prior to the official date of entry, July 4th. Congressional action would be before that date and even anticipated before Congress officially acted. At the time of Lincoln's death in 1865 there were 35, 36 and 37 star flags in circulation. The 35th, West Virginia, was unanticipated until 1863 when a section of Virginia (northwest part of the state) seceded from Virginia due to the slavery issue; the 36th, Nevada, was anticipated before and official in 1865; the 37th star, Nebraska, though anticipated was delayed prior to Congressional action on March 1, 1867 and the official entry date July 4, 1867. During those years the anticipation of flag makers resulted in a significant number of 36 and 37 star flags made in 1865. The attached ribbons are contemporary to this period.

Exhibition History:
(ZFC0276) Moraga Room Flag Label - January 2003
Special Memorial Day Display
Flags on Easels in the Moraga Room and Moraga annex

Presidio of San Francisco Officers Club
Memorial Day 2003

Chicago Meeting December, 2003
(ZFC0276)

University of California - Santa Cruz
Board of Councilors Meeting, Rare Flags Exhibit
Santa Cruz, CA
7 June 2012

The Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation & Library
LIFE AND TIMES OF ABRAHAM LINCOLN
The Exhibit
Simi Valley, CA
1 June 2014 to 30 September 2014

Appomattox Court House National Historic Park
150th Anniversary of the Surrender at Appomattox
Appomattox, VA
March - October 2015

Provenance:
• Funeral viewing of President Abraham Lincoln, Independence Hall, Philadelphia, PA, 21 April 1865.
• Mrs. Cahghlin, until conveyed to daughter.
• Mrs. Anna Cooper, until conveyed to Aston Heitmeuller.
• Aston Heitmeuller, 2 November 1922.
• Anonymous collector(s).
• Sold via Greg Martin Auctions, San Francisco, CA to Zaricor Flag Collection, 1996.


Sources:



Madaus, Howard M.- Whitney Smith, The American Flag: Two Centuries of Concord and Conflict, VZ Publications, Santa Cruz, 2006.

Mastai, Boleslaw and Marie-Louise D'Otrange, The Stars and The Stripes: The American Flag as Art and as History from the Birth of the republic to the Present, Knopf, New York, 1973.

37 Star Flag - (1867-1877) (U.S.), Flags of the World, 11 November 2011, from: http://www.crwflags.com/fotw/flags/us-1867.html

U. S. Bunting, Lowell Land Trust.Org, 11 November 2011, from: http://lowelllandtrust.org/greenwayclassroom/history/USBunting.pdf

Image Credits:
Zaricor Flag Collection



Hoist & Fly

Width of Hoist 25
Length of Fly 15.5

Union/Canton

Width of Union/Canton 9.5
Length of Union/Canton 8.5

Stars

Size of Stars 0.75

Stripes

Width of 1st Stripe 1.5
Width of 3rd Stripe 1.5
Width of 8th Stripe 1.5
Width of Last Stripe 1.5
Size of Hoist 0.25

Frame

Is it framed? yes
Frame Height 24.5
Frame Length 32.25

Stars

Number of Stars 37
How are the stars embeded? Printed
Are there stars on obverse? yes
Are there stars on reverse? yes
Star Field Design
  • Rectilinear - Horizontal

Stripes

Number of Stripes 13
Color of Top Stripe Red
Color of Bottom Stripe Red
Has a Blood Stripe? no

Nationality

Nation Represented United States

Fabric

Fabric Silk

Stitching

Stitching Machine

Weave

Type of Weave Plain

Attachment

Method of Attachment None

Applica

Applique Sides Single Faced = Mirror Image Reverse

PDF Files
Gallery Copy
Civil War Times Sept-Oct 1990 P,p.22-24

Documentation

Research Documents

Public Copy & Signs




Condition

Condition Fair
Damage Flag is used, torn silk fracturing.
Displayable yes

Date

Date 1865

Exhibit PDFs
NPS Commemorates the 150th Anniversary of Appomattox_ News Releas
Appomattox ..Announces Special Exhibits in Commemoration of the 150th Anniversary PRESS RELEASE
Special Moraga Room Memorial Day Exhibit, 2003

Exhibits

Exhibition Copy Exhibition History:

(ZFC0276) MORAGA ROOM FLAG LABEL - Jan. 2003
37-STAR UNITED STATES FLAG Date: About 1867-1876 Medium: Silk; machine stitched Comment: Represented as a flag related to the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. Text hand written on label under flag: Washington D.C. November 2, 1922. This is to certify that this silk flag 16X25.5 with 2 = 1iX16i = Red, White + Blue streamers. Now in possession of Daten Heitneuller was draped on the coffin of the President Abraham Lincoln in Philadelphia, Pa. in Independence Hall, April 21, 1865 and was presented to my mother, Mrs. Caughlin by Joe Stevy, the Guard. It was common practice in 19th century America to add stars to the flag prior to the official date of entry, July 4th. Congressional action would be before that date and even anticipated before Congress officially acted. At the time of Lincolns death in 1865 there were 35, 36 and 37-star flags in circulation. The 35th, West Virginia, was unanticipated until 1863 when a section of Virginia (northwest part of the state) seceded from Virginia due to the slavery issue; the 36th, Nevada, was anticipated before and official in 1865; the 37th star, Nebraska, though anticipated was delayed for 3 years prior to Congressional action on March 1, 1867 and the official entry date July 4, 1867. During those three years the anticipation of flag makers resulted in a number of 36 and 37 star flags in 1865. The ribbons attached are believed contemporary to this period. Provenance: Acquired by the Zaricor Flag Collection (ZFC0276) in 1997 from Greg Martin of San Francisco, CA.

Special Memorial Day Display
Flags on Easels in the Moraga Room and Moraga annex
Presidio of San Francisco's Officers Club
Memorial Day 2003
37-Star United States Flag
Date: Purportedly 1865; the 37-star flag became official on 4 July 1867 to recognize Nebraska's admission to the Union on 1 March 1867.
Comment: According to the family tradition and a note written in 1922 by the former owner, this flag was placed upon the coffin of Abraham Lincoln when his cortege stopped in Philadelphia on its journey back to Springfield, Illinois, in April 1865. The incongruity between the family claim and the number of stars on the flag presents a major difficulty with the story, reminiscent of the 1870 recitation of the family history of Betsy Ross.


Chicago Meeting December, 2003
(ZFC0276)
37-Star U.S. Flag (Abraham Lincolns Funeral)
Date: 18631865
Medium: Printed silk flag
Comment: In April of 1865 Southern malcontents in revenge for the Northern triumph assassinated President Abraham Lincoln over the South. The shocked and stunned country embraced their martyred President as never before. The funeral of Abraham Lincoln was a process rather than an event, and crowds flocked to railroad stations along the route from Washington, D.C. to Springfield, Illinois. Mementos of the funeral became quite popular with mourners. One practice was to have a personal flag placed briefly on the coffin. This 37-star U.S. flag is believed to be such a memorial piece related to the assassination of Abraham Lincoln.
The hand written label under flag reads: Washington DC November 2 1922. This is to certify that this silk flag 16X25.5 with 2 = 1iX16i = Red, White + Blue streamers. Now in possession of Daten Heitneuller was draped on the coffin of the President Abraham Lincoln in Philadelphia, Pa. in Independence Hall, April 21, 1865 and was presented to my mother, Mrs. Caughlin by Joe Stevy, the Guard.
Although the 37-star flag would not become official until 1867, it was common practice in 19th century America to add stars to the flag prior to the official date of entry, July 4th. Congressional action would be before that date and even anticipated before Congress officially acted. At the time of Lincoln's death in 1865 there were 35, 36 and 37 star flags in circulation.



University of California - Santa Cruz
Board of Councilors Meeting, 7 June 2012
Rare Flags Exhibit

Santa Cruz, CA, June 7, 2012: The Zaricor Flag Collection exhibited 34 flags and artifacts at the University of California Santa Cruz Campus for the Board of Councilors Meeting.

37 Star U.S.
"Lincoln Funeral" Flag

Date: 1865

Media: Printed silk flag and grosgrain ribbon.

Comment: This small 37 star silk flag 16" X 25.5" was placed on the casket
of President Abraham Lincoln while the body lay in state in Independence Hall
Philadelphia, Pa., 22 and 23 April 1865. Secretary of War William Stanton
imposed restrictions regarding the body's disposition while it was on public view,
which included his infamous edict that no photographs were to be allowed of the
President's body nor flags placed on the casket, both which were followed except
for the clandestine act of Jeremiah Gurney's photograph of the body lying in state
in City Hall in N.Y. The photographs we confiscated and destroyed and thought
to be lost until a single copy was rediscovered in 1952 in the Illinois State
Historical Library.
This is the only documented flag placed on Abraham Lincoln's casket during the
viewing at Independence Hall. Like the photograph, this flag went unnoticed by
historians because the 37 star flag did not become official (earliest date) 1 March
1867, two years after the death of Lincoln. However, what was not widely known
is that the 37th state, Nebraska made three attempts to have the state constitution
accepted by Congress, prerequisite to joining the Union but twice rejected in
1864 and again in 1865 and accepted in 1867. In the Zaricor Collection there are
two documented 37 star flags of the same construction and size plus a third flag,
which indicates at least two flag companies anticipated Nebraska's entry into the
Union in 1864/65. Thus 37 star flags were available to the general public at the
time of the president's funeral.

Provenance: Acquired by the Zaricor Flag Collection (ZFC0276) in 1996 the
family of Mrs. Anna Cooper by Greg Martin via Private Treaty, San Francisco, CA.
www.FlagCollection.com

The Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation & Library
LIFE AND TIMES OF ABRAHAM LINCOLN
The Exhibit
Simi Valley, CA
1 June 2014 to 30 September 2014
Exhibition Images
Cover

Cover

Frontispiece

Frontispiece

Frontispiece Detail

Frontispiece Detail