CIVIL WAR
CIVIL WAR

CIVIL WAR

BUCKLE

BUCKLE

SASH

SASH

Book Photo

Book Photo

Book Photo

Book Photo

Book Photo

Book Photo

Book Photo

Book Photo

Sash

Sash

Sword Belt & Plate

Sword Belt & Plate

Front

Front

Catalog image

Catalog image

ZFC0492

Gen. Custer's sword-belt plate, belt and sash.

Sub-collection: General George A. Custer

U.S. M-1851 General Gen. Custer's Model 1851 sword-belt plate, buckle and sash.
General George Custer's Army sword-belt plate, belt and sash from the Civil War. General Custer was married in this ensemble in 1864 and there are historical photos of him wearing these items.

Following is a transcript of General Custer's speech to the soldiers of the 3rd Cavalry Division, at Appomattox Court House, Virginia, April 9, 1865, after the surrender of Robert E. Lee:

Custer's Presentation to the 3rd Div. on the Occasion of the Surrender of the Army of Northern Virgina, April 9, 1865 Appomatox Court House, Virgina:

"With profound gratitude toward the God of battles, by whose blessings our enemies have been humbled and our arms rendered triumphant, your commanding General avails himself of this, his first opportunity to express to you his admiration of the heroic manner in which you have passed through the series of battles which today resulted in the surrender of the enemy's entire army.

The record established by your indomitable courage is unparalleled in the annals of war. Your prowess has won for you even the respect and admiration of your enemies. During the past six months, although in most instances confronted by superior numbers, you have captured from the enemy, in open battle, one hundred and eleven pieces of field artillery, sixty-five battleflags, and upwards of ten thousand prisoners of war, including seven general officers. Within the past ten days, and included in the above, you have captured forty-six pieces of field artillery and thirty-seven battle-flags. You have never lost a gun, never lost a color, and have never been defeated; and notwithstanding the numerous engagements in which you have borne a prominent part, including those memorable battles of the Shenandoah, you have captured every piece of artillery which the enemy has dared to open upon you. The near approach of peace renders it improbable that you will again be called upon to undergo the fatigues of the toilsome march or the exposure of the battle-field; but should the assistance of keen blades, wielded by your sturdy arms, be required to hasten the coming of that glorious peace for which we have been so long contending, the General commanding is
proudly confident that, in the future as in the past, every demand will meet with a hearty and willing response.

Let us hope that our work is done, and that, blessed with the comforts of peace, we may be permitted to enjoy the pleasures of home and friends. For our comrades who have fallen, let us ever cherish a grateful remembrance. To the wounded and to those who languish in Southern prisons, let our heartfelt sympathy be tendered. And now, speaking for myself alone, when the war is ended and the task of the historian begins when those deeds of daring which have rendered the name and fame of the Third Cavalry Division imperishable are inscribed upon the bright pages of our country's history, I only ask that my name be written as that of the commander of the Third Cavalry Division."

G. A. Custer, Brevet Major General Commanding

Publication History:
Katz, D. Mark, Custer in Photographs, New York, Bonanza Books, 1985. P. 23-24..

Madaus, Howard M., Dr, Whitney Smith, The American Flag: Two Centuries of Concord and Conflict. Santa Cruz: VZ Publications, 2006, p. 84.

Provenance:
• Brigadier-General George A. Custer, 3rd Cavalry Division, Cavalry Corps of the Army of the Potomac, 1861 - 1865.
• Retained by Lt. Colonel (Brevet Major General) G.A. Custer until passing, 1876.
• By descent in the Nevin Custer family until, 1995.
• Sold via Butterfield & Butterfield Auction House of San Francisco, CA, to the Zaricor Flag Collection, 1995.


ZFC Significant Flag

Sources:



Madaus, Howard M., Dr, Whitney Smith, The American Flag: Two Centuries of Concord and Conflict. Santa Cruz: VZ Publications, 2006.

Katz, D. Mark, Custer in Photographs, New York, Bonanza Books, 1985.

Image Credits:
Zaricor Flag Collection



Frame

Is it framed? no

Stars

Are there stars on obverse? no
Are there stars on reverse? no

Stripes

Has a Blood Stripe? no

Crest/Emblem

Description of Crest/Emblem M-1851 Sword Belt Plate bearing the arms of the U.S. with crimson sash.

Nationality

Nation Represented United States

Documentation

Research Documents



Public Copy & Signs


Condition

Condition Good
Damage Used, worn
Displayable yes

Date

Date 1863-1864

Exhibits

Exhibition Copy First Presidio Exhibit
(ZFC0315)
LITHOGRAPH, "THE STAR-SPANGLED BANNER"
Date: About 1860-1880
Medium: Lithograph on paper
Comment: During the third quarter of the nineteenth century, the lithographic firm of Currier & Ives mass-produced great numbers of patriotic and sentimental illustrations for public consumption. The insult to the United States flag flying over Fort Sumter resurrected the memory of another U.S. flag flying over another fort under attack – Fort McHenry in Baltimore Harbor during the British bombardment of the night of September 13th, 1814. That attack caused Francis Scott Key to pen the poem (almost immediately set to music) "The Star-Spangled Banner". Although the original "Star-Spangled Banner" had disappeared into private hands at the outbreak of the Civil War, the fifteen-star, fifteen-stripe flag's image still resounded as a patriotic appeal. The original flag now resides in the collections of Smithsonian Institution and is undergoing extensive conservation.
Provenance: Acquired by the Zaricor Flag Collection (ZFC0315) in 1998 from Wesley Cowan auction of Cincinnati, OH.

Second Presidio Exhibit, 2003- Gallery II
(ZFC0315)
The Star Spangled Banner Lithograph
Date: About 1860–1880
Media: Lithograph on paper
Comment: During the third quarter of the 19th century, the lithographic firm of Currier & Ives mass-produced patriotic and sentimental illustrations for public consumption. While today this lithograph may seem to be only a generic tribute to the national flag, it held special meaning at the time it was produced. The 1861 assault on the United States flag flying over Fort Sumter was fresh in the minds of the general public. It resurrected the memory of another U.S. flag flying over a fort under attack-Fort McHenry in Baltimore harbor during the British bombardment on the night of September 13, 1814. That event had resulted in the penning of a poem (almost immediately set to music) by Francis Scott Key, "The Star-Spangled Banner." Although the original Star-Spangled Banner had disappeared into private hands long before the Civil War, the name and image of that 15-star, 15-stripe flag still resounded as a patriotic appeal. Today the original flag is considered to be the premier item held by the Smithsonian Institution, where it is currently undergoing extensive conservation.
Provenance: Acquired by the Zaricor Flag Collection (ZFC0315) in 1998 from Wesley Cowan Auction of Cincinnati, OH.
PDF for Publications
Custer in Photographs

Publications

Publication Copy Katz, D. Mark, Custer in Photographs, New York, Bonanza Books, 1985. Pp.154. See pages 23-24 for image of belt & buckle.

Madaus, Howard M., Dr, Whitney Smith, The American Flag: Two Centuries of Concord and Conflict. Santa Cruz: VZ Publications, 2006, p. 84. (NB: Image is sword belt plate only.)

Following is a transcript of General Custer's speech to the soldiers of the 3rd Cavalry Division, at Appomattox Court House, Virginia, April 9, 1865, after the surrender of Robert E. Lee:

"With profound gratitude toward the God of battles, by whose blessings our enemies have been humbled and our arms rendered triumphant, your commanding General avails himself of this, his first opportunity to express to you his admiration of the heroic manner in which you have passed through the series of battles which today resulted in the surrender of the enemy's entire army.

The record established by your indomitable courage is unparalleled in the annals of war. Your prowess has won for you even the respect and admiration of your enemies. During the past six months, although in most instances confronted by superior numbers, you have captured from the enemy, in open battle, one hundred and eleven pieces of field artillery, sixty-five battleflags, and upwards of ten thousand prisoners of war, including seven general officers. Within the past ten days, and included in the above, you have captured forty-six pieces of field artillery and thirty-seven battle-flags. You have never lost a gun, never lost a color, and have never been defeated; and notwithstanding the numerous engagements in which you have borne a prominent part, including those memorable battles of the Shenandoah, you have captured every piece of artillery which the enemy has dared to open upon you. The near approach of peace renders it improbable that you will again be called upon to undergo the fatigues of the toilsome march or the exposure of the battle-field; but should the assistance of keen blades, wielded by your sturdy arms, be required to hasten the coming of that glorious peace for which we have been so long contending, the
General commanding is proudly confident that, in the future as in the past, every demand will meet with a hearty and willing response.

Let us hope that our work is done, and that, blessed with the comforts of peace, we may be permitted to enjoy the pleasures of home and friends. For our comrades who have fallen, let us ever cherish a grateful remembrance. To the wounded and to those who languish in Southern prisons, let our heartfelt sympathy be tendered. And now, speaking for myself alone, when the war is ended and the task of the historian begins when those deeds of daring which have rendered the name and fame of the Third Cavalry Division imperishable are inscribed upon the bright pages of our country's history, I only ask that my name be written as that of the commander of the Third Cavalry Division."

G. A. Custer, Brevet Major General Commanding